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20121208
20121208
Search Results 0 to 16 of about 17 (some duplicates have been removed)
support the inflammatory flames heard on the floor of the u.s. senate used to block a u.n. treaty. a treaty meant to improve the lives of millions of disabled people around the world. hundreds of millions. the treaty is called the united nations conventions on the rights of persons with disabilities. it was modeled on the americans with disabilities act. the treaty was meant to encourage other countries to be more like the u.s. on the issue of equal rights for the disabled. also disabled americans who visit or live in other countries could potentially benefit from the u.n. treaty. 125 countries ratified it. but on tuesday, 38 u.s. republican senators voted against it. there names are right there. some of them flip-flopped at the last minute. some had signaled support for the treaty and then indicated they'd vote for it only to vote against it. one of the measure's co-sponsored, jerry mirrand, actually voted against it. so the guy who co-sponsored it voted against it. we asked him to come on the program yesterday, today as well. he declined. a former senator got involved on this as
that might support the inflammatory claims heard on the floor of the u.s. senate that were used to block a u.n. treaty, a treaty meant to improve the lives of millions of disabled people around the entire world. now, the treaty is called the united nations conventions on the rights of persons with disabilities and it was modeled on the americans with disabilities act. now, the treaty was meant to encourage other countries to be more like the u.s. on the issue of equal rights for the disabled. also disabled americans or vets who visit or live in other countries could potentially benefit from the treaty. 125 countries ratified the treaty but on tuesday, 38 u.s. republicans, senators, voted against it. their names right there on the right of the screen. some of them flip-flopped at the last minute, some senators had actually signaled support for the treaty, then indicated that they would vote for it only to vote against it. one of the actual measures co-sponsors of it, he actually voted against it. one of the co-sponsors. amazing. he voted against the bill he had co-sponsored. we asked him to c
on a place. the u.s. is on tract to become energy independent. why that's bad news after this. ! bring it back! bring it home! [ male announcer ] when you combine creamy velveeta with zesty rotel tomatoes and green chilies, you get a bowl of queso that makes even this get-together better. let's see if we can get the same item at walmart for less? okay. fijit friends. fifteen bucks on rollback. wow! that's a savings of over 29 bucks! twenty-nine bucks!!?? and they're powered by friendship. see for yourself if you could save on the brands you want. walmart. see for yourself if you could save on the brands you want. try running four.ning a restaurant is hard, fortunately we've got ink. it gives us 5x the rewards on our internet, phone charges and cable, plus at office supply stores. rewards we put right back into our business. this is the only thing we've ever wanted to do and ink helps us do it. make your mark with ink from chase. >>> my story of the week, saudi america. they have a $300 signing bonus to new employees. you heard that right. with a 7.7% nationwide up unemployment rate, pe
washington got into a budget battle like this? lawmakers put a band aid on the problem and the u.s. lost its aaa credit rating in the process. i warned you about the economic storm headed our way, partly because of europe and partly because of this fiscal cliff. i also told you about an american economic renaissance that could be just ahead. just beyond the storm clouds. the fiscal cliff is fixable. every day washington fails to make a deal, more damage is being done. john king, ken rogath is the former chief economist at the international monetary fund and diane swonk joins us from mezro financial. john, some people say don't sweat it. the threat of going over the fiscal cliff is overblown. it will get done in an 11th hour deal. as you read the politics at play, what do you see? >> both sides digging in. you played the president saying, i want that rate hike. the republicans say we'll give you the revenues but not through a rate hike. the president believes he won the election and he upped the ante saying he wants twice as much in tax revenues than he wanted a year and a half ago. the presi
atmosphere of the city. albany, known as one of the most populace cities in the u.s. in 1810, is home to several institutions of higher learning including the university at albany, state university of new york, the albany the law school which is the fourth oldest law school in the u.s. and the albany college of pharmacy and health sciences. >> we're in the university at albany library's department of special collections and archives, and we're the main repository on campus for collecting archival records, historical records and primary sources that are used by students, teachers, professors, scholars, journalists and many others to do historical research. [background sounds] >> the national death penalty archive was started here at the university at albany in 2001. it was a partnership between the around conservativist -- archivists here and faculty members in the school of criminal justice. there is no national death penalty archive for documenting the fascinating history of capital punishment in the united states, so we set forth to establish the first death penalty archive. and wha
the u.s. president should take a in terms of a more realistic, short-term approach to facing challenges are a long term visionary approach where the focus is on the future and where we are going in the next 10-20 years. which of the following approaches to you think a u.s. presidential candidate should take? you will see two options. should a u.s. president take a practical approach and difficult times addressing near-term challenges or a visionary approach focusing on long-term goals for the future and not losing perspective of where we want to go to? go ahead and text to 22333. the response code you agree with et.you can tweak at @gt we will see if it matches the opinion poll. a fair size minority, about the 44% felt short-term obstacles was the important focus of the nation. it looks like once again we have come close to the national poll with 67% of the audience i in the room and online voting for a visionary approach looking at long-term goals for the country instead of a short-term perspective. i think this would be another good thing for elected officials to keep a in mind as the
do. >> depositions rising in syria as the u.s. confirms its stance on political transition there. >> the united states stands with the syrian people in insirsing that any transition process result in a unified, democratic syria in which all citizens are represented. sunni any allawi, christians, kurds, druce, women, every syrian must be included in this process for a new and better future and a future of this kind cannot possibly include assad. >> is just who is president bashar assad and how big of a threat is he to the world? here to weigh in senior fellow defense studdies lt. colonel tony shaffer. set up for the audience who is bashar assad? >> bashar assad is the former president of the syria took over in 1971. and ruled frank whether i an iron fist assad took over in. there was hope that there would be reforms and much like other dictators who come in. it's double down and continue the same policies and trends as his former -- the person he replaced. we saw this in north korea and we are seeing it again. >> talk about the latest news. there are reports that assad has weapons
,400 people and launched the u.s. into world war ii. a sailor found himself on battleship west virginia december 7th, 1941. he vat down with cbs 5 reporter ann makovec and told her how he managed to survive the attack. >> at first i said hel l, no, i'm not going abandon my ship. >> john will never forget those moments from december 7th, 1941 when he was stationed in pearl harbor hawaii. >> i was on the battleship,ss west virginia. a great big monster. i looked and saw a plane head for my ship >> then he six torpedos head out. >> we had an outstanding crew on that ship, unfortunately. >> he is 92 years old but his memories are as sharp as ever. he attended this memorial service this morning on coast guard island. and we sat down to talk about the darkest moments of that day. >> and what i did, i would grab the sailor's hair and pull it just as hard as i could. if i got a moan or groan or sign of life, i would take him out to the other group of sailors to get him medical help because i didn't have time to take out dead bodies, and there were a lot of them. >> more than 100 people died on
different laws than we do. if there say technology drain, it's also in terms of the u.s. laws we only prohibit certain type of technology that has to do with national security and technology. but when you talk in steve's case the talent of the invite tive things that get sucked out along with that, that's nobody really talks about that so i'd like to hear from you. >> it's true. what you are saying is true. it goes back to what i was saying the other countries are being a magnet for talent, there is no question about this so we have to recognize that is happening and make sure we're competitive. my own view is if people want to come here and get an education and go back to their country, fine, that is a way to build stronger committees in other parts of the world. that is part of our stated policy. having people come here if they want to go back and start companies there, that's fine. but we should at least give them the option of staying here. if they want to go back fine, but don't force them. encourage them to stay because we need smart people here working on these new technologies
same-sex couples. >> 526 days after president obama made that statement, for the first time ever, the u.s. supreme court agreed today to take a serious look at the issue of marriage equality. the court today granted a review of the voter-approved ban on same-sex marriage in california called proposition 8, and the defense of marriage act, a federal law, that declares marriage is only a legal union between one man and one woman. the defense of marriage act bars the federal government from recognizing the validity of same-sex marriages in states where they are legal under state law. nine states -- connecticut, iowa, maine, maryland, massachusetts, new hampshire, new york, vermont, and washington allow same-sex marriage or soon will. so does washington, d.c. record lines are expected for those wanting a first come, first serve seat during the historic supreme court proceedings. as nbc's pete williams puts it, today's move by the supreme court could result in the roe v. wade of guy rights. joining me now is political strategist steve elmendorf and chris geithner, senior political reporter for
in the u.s. cincinnati, and one of the guys from illinois ended up president. >> is the south ready for a black senator? you've got to be kidding. will nbc ever stop trying to divide this country along racial lines? an important question at a time where we need to really help save america. joij me witjoining me with reacd web, basil smichael. let me play this. chicago is racist, urban is racist. can't say these words because they're, quote, dog whistles to nbc. they're the worst perpetratorrors of this. watch a small snip pet of highlights. >> it was just frustrating to watch a guy lie to the american people ant not be counter punched because we're afraid he's going to be called an anglely black man. when i see the president, i don't see a black man. >> talking about getting the work requirement for welfare is dishonest. you're playing the ethnic card. he keeps saying chicago, by the way. did you notice? this guy is helping the poor people in a bad neighborhood skewing us in the burbs. >> a dog whistle is a dog whistle, clarence. a trumpet call is another. shuck and jive has a parti
make up 13% of the u.s. population. by 2050, they are expected to be 20%. 20%. that means you'll need to spend a lot more on social security and medicare. meanwhile the development of new miracle treatments we hope will keep happening and that will push the cost even higher. the future turns out to be expensive. that's simply the reality of it. and opposing tax increases doesn't change that reality. there's nothing in grover norquist's pledge that stops the aging process. if there was, i would take it. so there's no way the tax receipts of the 1960s will support the demographics of america in the 2020s or the 2030s. anyone who says otherwise is not taking the reality seriously. joining us is a man who always takes reality seriously. chris hayes. >> religiously. >> religiously. so one thing i always think is true in our political discussions is we don't like to face up to big changes. we like to use them as evidence for why whatever policies we support need to happen. but particularly the aging of this society, i don't think we've come anywhere close to thinking about what that will me
Search Results 0 to 16 of about 17 (some duplicates have been removed)